Organise helps you to get a fairer deal at work

 

Team up. Make work right.

Every day people use Organise to transform their working lives -- directly inside their workplaces and through campaigning nationally. Whether it’s a store assistant calling for at least three people on shifts in case of an accident, or a self-employed mum campaigning to change the law around shared parental pay. Together we’re creating a powerful community who stand up for each other and win positive change in our working lives. 

You can flag a concern about work or start a campaign to win change on our site, and our staff and volunteers will help you every step of the way:

 
Here’s April and four of her colleagues delivering her petition to Waterstones MD, James Daunt.

Here’s April and four of her colleagues delivering her petition to Waterstones MD, James Daunt.

Waterstones staff are campaigning for a living wage. Nearly 10,000 staff, authors and customers signed bookseller April’s petition. They crowdfunded and published a book filled with staff experiences of what it’s like living on less than a living wage. To protect staff anonymity, the stories featured in the book changed their names to the names of their favourite authors.

"I have worked for Waterstones for 20 years and love being a bookseller but our wages are forcing colleagues to seek other employment. We’ve been tolerating the low pay for so long, it’s so good we’re finally doing something about it." - Waterstones Bookseller from Sussex

 

Current campaigns:

 
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How does it work?

 
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JOINING THE COMMUNITY
By signing a petition or taking part in a survey on our website, you join the Organise community.
 

DECIDING WHAT TO FIX
Each week 10% of the community is sent a confidential survey about  'What it's like at your work'. Through this, we spot shared challenges that collective action could fix.

You start a campaign at your workplace. This can be a petition, an open letter, a survey or something else. You can campaign on anything from breaks, to parental pay, to the gender pay gap, to guaranteed hours.
 

GROWING AND WINNING YOUR CAMPAIGN
Gather support for your campaign through your networks at work. Organise will also help you gather support through our community.

The network of people supporting a workplace campaign can talk to each other through Organise. They work with an Organiser to decide how best to win their campaign. This could include meeting with the CEO to deliver the petition, or collecting data on people's lived experiences in the company and presenting it to the HR team or even the newspapers.
 

PAYING IT FORWARD
Once you've won your campaign at work, you can go on to start more campaigns or become a volunteer mentor to help other people improve their working lives.
 

Success stories

Charlie teamed up with 2,000 others and won a change to how she's paid at Tesco:

"I'd never heard of prepaid cards for wages, if I had, I wouldn't have taken the job. I'm glad we won so no-one else is forced to use a card that charges you to pay bills."

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Amazon workers want a full 30 minute break. ITV employees want better parental leave.

What do you want to change? Team up, make work right:

OrganiseLabs

Data is powerful. Each week 10% of Organise members share our experiences of work in the UK. Together we can spot shared challenges and team up to overcome them:

McDonald's workers

McDonald's workers in the UK

More than 2,000 McDonald’s workers use Organise to campaign for £10 an hour, better safety equipment and a new contract. They’ve just won the biggest pay rise in a decade - with £10 an hour for the over 25s. Join the campaign:

 

River Island employees

River Island employees

Hundreds of River Island staff are sharing their experiences of what it's like to work at the company. They want to be able to swap shifts with colleagues when they need to. Sign their petition here:

ready to join tens of thousands of others and

Team up?

 

Organise campaigns featured in:

 

And check out the feature pieces on Organise in the Financial Times, Huffington Post and others:

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